FINE ANTIQUE ORIENTAL RUGS XXXI There are 111 Lots.

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Showing 41 - 60 of 111 items
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    3 000 €

    Lot: 41

    237 x 123 cm (7' 9" x 4')
    East Turkestan, early 19th century
    Condition: good according to age, low pile, foundation partially visible, lower end incomplete, one hole at upper right side backed with fabric, scattered small repairs, signs of use at the sides
    Published: „Gewebt und geknüpft IV, antike Teppiche und Textilien aus oberösterreichischem Privatbesitz", Georg Butterweck, 2011, plate 27
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 6000 - 8000
    3 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    3 000 €

    Lot: 42

    207 x 114 cm (6' 9" x 3' 9")
    East Turkestan, 19th century
    Condition: good according to age, low pile, foundation partially visible, both lower corners incomplete, one missing part at upper end, one small hole at lower end, signs of use
    Published: „Gewebt und geknüpft IV, antike Teppiche und Textilien aus oberösterreichischem Privatbesitz", Georg Butterweck, 2011, plate 37
    Warp: cotton, weft: cotton, pile: silk

    The rare field design of this silk rug reminds us initially of the pomegranate design for which East Turkestan is famous. Closer inspection reveals inspirations from more westerly traditions. Safavid Persia is known for having an influence on the Kashgar oasis.

    Not only the metal brocading technique, well known from the so-called Polonaise carpets, but also the very naturalistic flowery designs of the herati style arrived in the most western of the East Turkestan oases. This specific interpretation of the herati style is rare, but a remarkably similar example can be found in the MAK in Vienna. That carpet, almost identical, came to the museum in 1906 from the K.K. Handels-Museum. It is published in H. Natschläger/A. Völker, Knüpfteppiche aus China und Ostturkestan, 1986, p. 46.

    Chinese influence can be found in the minor borders so typical for East Turkestan. As early as the 16th century the design appears in classical Chinese carpets. The main border shows, on a blue ground, the boxy three-flower motif which is typical for East Turkestan and is sometimes put into squares. A long rug with the same extremely rare field design was with Moke Mokotoff and is published in HALI 85, p. 103.

    Estimate: € 6000 - 8000
    3 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    4 000 €

    Lot: 43

    259 x 119 cm (8' 6" x 3' 11")
    East Turkestan, mid 19th century
    Condition: good according to age, low pile in places, both ends partially slightly incomplete, scattered small old repairs
    Published: „Gewebt und geknüpft IV, antike Teppiche und Textilien aus oberösterreichischem Privatbesitz", Georg Butterweck, 2011, plate 26
    „Antike Orientteppiche aus österreichischem Privatbesitz", TKF, 1986, plate 127
    Provenance: Count Vinzenz Baillet de Latour (Minister for Culture and Education 1897-1898), mentioned in the catalog of the exhibition of oriental carpets in the Imperial and Royal Austrian Trade Museum Vienna 1891, No. 273
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    East Turkestan was Buddhist for the first thousand years CE, and it is not until the 15th century that Islam could be said to have taken over completely. That is one of the reasons why Hans Bidder in his ground-breaking work Teppiche aus Ost-Turkestan established the theory that three medallion carpets are based on the idea of Buddha sitting on the centre medallion attended by two bodhisattvas on either side. Does this four-medallion rug, which seems to show a little ram's horn in the field, throw the idea out of the window, or is it just the exception to the rule? Neither - careful observation actually supports the theory. It is full of Buddhist symbols. Hidden at the bottom of the outer border we find a swastika, an endless knot in the top left corner as well as above the upper medallion, and to the right something which could be a flute. There are Chinese cloud depictions in the border and in the lower medallion, and in the top medallion we find the Chintamani motif which also has its roots in Buddhism. Note the almost three-dimensional two yellow flowers in the field which are very much Chinese in style.
    Only a handful of four-medallion East Turkestan carpets are known. But it is not only rarity that makes this rug exceptional but also the wonderfully playful way it represents the syncretism of East and West. The carpet was published by Rainer Grünzner in HALI 6/4 on p. 6 and way before it was mentioned in "Katalog Nr. 273 Ausstellung Orientalischer Teppiche im
    K.K. Österr: Handelsmuseum 1891", the first carpet exhibition in the world.

    Estimate: € 8000 - 12000
    4 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    10 000 €

    Lot: 44

    192 x 133 cm (6' 4" x 4' 4")
    Turkey, 17th century
    Condition: according to age, several small flaws backed with fabric, several small old repairs, minimally stained
    Provenance: Ex-collection of Dr. Wilhelm von Schlag, Vienna
    Supposed to have been captured during the 2nd Ottoman siege of Vienna by Count Sigbert Heister (1646 - 1718)
    Exhibited in the castle museum Aichberg from 1996 - 2022
    Silk on linen

    This Ottoman quilt cover is believed to have been captured by Sigbert Count Heister (1646-1718) during the second siege of Vienna in 1683 by Ottoman armies. The dates are correct as typically this embroidered is of the design and quality that is associated with the output of Istanbul's professional embroidery workshops in the late 17th century.
    Used as a quilt cover, this embroidery reflects the designs and colours used on the complex woven silks embellished with metal thread used in the Ottoman court, with white and yellow silk being used to specifically mimic the silver and gilt-metal the richer woven textiles.
    Since textiles were an important part of everyday life in Ottoman society, used to decorate prestigious items and as a means of display wealth, status and women's skill, one would expect soldiers to have many items of embroidery with them, and thus the connection with the Ottoman armies last stand in Europe has much to recommend it.
    There are textiles in MAK in Vienna with such a provenance.
    This textile was in the collection of Dr. Wilhelm von Schlag, Vienna, and was exhibited in Schlossmuseum Aichberg (1996 – 2022).

    Estimate: € 20000 - 30000
    10 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    1 000 €

    Lot: 45

    330 x 178 cm (10' 10" x 5' 10")
    Caucasus, dated 1335 (1917)
    Condition: good, scattered small repairs, slight signs of use
    Warp: wool, weft: wool

    Estimate: € 2000 - 3000
    1 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    1 500 €

    Lot: 46

    227 x 172 cm (7' 5" x 5' 8")
    Azerbaijan, late 19th century
    Condition: very good, minor signs of use
    Warp: wool, weft: wool and cotton

    Estimate: € 3000 - 4000
    1 500 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    700 €

    Lot: 47

    74 x 78 cm each (2' 5" x 2' 7" each)
    Persia, ca. 1900
    Condition: good, scattered low pile, minor small repairs, minor signs of use
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 1400 - 1800
    700 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    600 €

    Lot: 48

    223 x 157 cm (7' 4" x 5' 2")
    Persia, early 20th century
    Condition: very good, minor small repairs, minor abrasions, fringes partially added at upper end
    Warp: wool, weft: wool

    Estimate: € 1200 - 1800
    600 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    2 000 €

    Lot: 49

    227 x 111 cm (7' 5" x 3' 8")
    Caucasus, late 19th century
    Condition: very good, good pile, scattered small repairs
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 4000 - 6000
    2 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    2 000 €

    Lot: 50

    274 x 155 cm (9' x 5' 1")
    Caucasus, late 19th century
    Condition: very good, full pile, scattered small professional repairs and reweavings
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 4000 - 6000
    2 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    1 000 €

    Lot: 51

    314 x 133 cm (10' 4" x 4' 4")
    Caucasus, second half 19th century
    Condition: good, partially corroded dark brown, scattered low pile, both lower corners restored, several old repairs
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 2000 - 3000
    1 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    2 000 €

    Lot: 52

    230 x 162 cm (7' 7" x 5' 4")
    Caucasus, late 19th century
    Condition: very good, good pile, partially corroded dark brown, scattered small professional repairs
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 4000 - 6000
    2 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    1 000 €

    Lot: 53

    190 x 142 cm (6' 3" x 4' 8")
    Persia, ca. 1900
    Condition: very good, scattered small repairs, slight signs of use
    Warp: wool, weft: wool

    Estimate: € 2000 - 3000
    1 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    5 000 €

    Lot: 54

    165 x 126 cm (5' 5" x 4' 2")
    Persia, ca. 1880
    Condition: very good according to age, minor small repairs at the corners, minor signs of use
    Warp: silk, weft: silk, pile: silk

    Estimate: € 10000 - 14000
    5 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    1 000 €

    Lot: 55

    246 x 160 cm (8' 1" x 5' 3")
    Persia, late 19th century
    Condition: good, low pile in places, minor small repairs, selvages rebound
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 2000 - 3000
    1 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    3 500 €

    Lot: 56

    193 x 137 cm (6' 4" x 4' 6")
    Persia, second half 19th century
    Condition: good, mostly good pile, scattered small repairs, minor signs of use
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 7000 - 10000
    3 500 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    5 000 €

    Lot: 57

    200 x 153 cm (6' 7" x 5')
    Turkey, mid 19th century
    Condition: very good according to age, mostly good pile, corroded dark brown, scattered small repairs
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    While there appear to be no comparative examples of West-Anatolian carpets with this design, that should not be understood as exceptionally unusual, since the village weavers in the Bergama region were endlessly inventive in creating field designs that were variations on classical carpet design traditions.
    Here the interplay between reciprocal space creates what appear to be two red medallions - but on closer inspection the red ground field is enclosed by encroaching medallions that are part of a repeating patterns that extends beyond the borders.
    The appearance of lots of small animals, stars and amulets reflecting local jewellery throughout the field is particularly attractive. The yellow ground border is well known in early 19th-century rugs from central and West Anatolia, and the use of a deep aubergine colour in the field also endorses that dating.

    Estimate: € 10000 - 14000
    5 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    10 000 €

    Lot: 58

    132 x 115 cm (4' 4" x 3' 9")
    Turkey, 18th century
    Condition: very good according to age, low pile in places, almost completely corroded dark brown, both ends slightly incomplete, backed with fabric
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    This early example of a triple-mihrab Konya prayer rug is unique in that the mihrabs have no columns, and the beautifully abrashed red ground below these mihrabs is filled with slender flowering stems. The space between the mihrabs is filled with tree forms but can only be seen in relief now, since the black wool has corroded, adding further allure to the design by implying three-dimensionality to the arches.
    Interestingly the trees meet above the central arch to imply another prayer arch. In the border the narrow stem that traces its way around the rosettes has also oxidised, adding to the character of the rug. The colour tone is particularly pleasing, emphasising the contrast between the light yellow, many shades of red and ivory, and the dark-blue and aubergine.
    It is also worth drawing attention to the finer-than-usual knot count of this rug seen in the narrow corroded vine in the border. It allows maximum impact of the red abrash in the field.

    Estimate: € 20000 - 26000
    10 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    12 000 €

    Lot: 59

    157 x 122 cm (5' 2" x 4')
    Turkey, early 18th century
    Condition: good according to age, low pile, several small old repairs, both kilim ends and sides partially damaged, minor small holes, age related signs of use
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    With 'floating' columns and an enlarged 'mosque lamp' motif dominating the red field of the mihrab, this so-called 'Basra Gördes' prayer rug belongs to a subgroup of 18th century red-ground west Anatolian Ghiordes and Kula single niche rugs that preserve many of the characteristics of their 17th century 'Transylvanian' precursors.
    Among several examples published by Stefano Ionescu in 'Antique Ottoman Rugs in Transylvania', 2005, Cat. 216-220, it most closely resembles Cat. 216, an early 18th century rug formerly in the Evangelical Parish Church and now in the Brukenthal Museum, Sibiu, Romania (M.1625), with which it shares the rosette, palmette and leaf bracket primary border as well as the highly stylized jagged ascending plant design in the blue-ground spandrels and floral panel above. Interestingly, when inverted (as it would have been woven), the hanging ornament morphs into a well-drawn ibrik (ewer) motif.

    Estimate: € 25000 - 35000
    12 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    5 000 €

    Lot: 60

    243 x 174 cm (8' x 5' 9")
    Caucasus, second half 19th century
    Condition: very good, full pile, partially corroded dark brown, few small repairs, one sewn up tear, upper end original (not shortened)
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    This large weaving has all of the characteristics of a carpet made in a village for home use: it is thick, dense pile and large size give it real weight, and the design has numerous idiosyncrasies that defy easy categorisation into known Caucasian rug typologies.
    The most striking feature is the scale and designs of the borders, as it is quite unusual for all three borders to have different designs and all to be of equal size; note the way that the blue and white borders have different renderings of the design on the vertical and horizontal axes.
    It is clear that this rug was designed as it was being woven rather than directly copied from a cartoon, shown in the way that the field starts with a different design and size before the large hooked Memling style guls become the main motif.
    A particularly nice feature is the way that the secondary field designs that are cut off by the vertical borders are filled with lots of little polychrome squares, almost like an artist colour palette, as well as the very unsual border designs.
    This vibrant and dynamic carpet shows how inventive and skilled the village weavers were in the southern Caucasus in the mid 19th century creating artworks full of improvisation and innovation.

    Estimate: € 10000 - 15000
    5 000 €
Showing 41 - 60 of 111 items