APRIL 25TH 2020

ANCIENT ART OF EGYPT
ANCIENT CHINESE BRONZE
FINE ANTIQUE ORIENTAL RUGS XIX

Auction: April 25th 2020, 4pm
Preview: April 23rd and 24th from 11am to 6pm, April 25th from 11am to 4pm

APRIL 25TH 2020 There are 76 Lots.

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Showing 61 - 76 of 76 items
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    10 000 €

    Lot: 61

    Yellowish patinated limestone, a minimal pressure mark at the tip of the nose, otherwise in excellent condition
    Height appx. 205 mm, width appx. 240 mm, depth up to appx. 32 mm
    New Kingdom, XIXth dynasty around 1300-1250 BC (dated by Dr. André Wiese, Antikenmuseum Basel),
    Provenance: Jean-David Cahn, Basel, from an old French private collection
    (Mr. M., Paris), 2008, private collection Austria

    The enchanting fragment shows a slightly cylindrical curved surface and originates obviously from a column of an Isis sanctuary, or from a tomb, since the inscription also refers to Isis as the Mistress of the West. She wears a strap dress, the three-piece wig of the gods and fine necklaces.

    Where the fragment comes from is unknown, the rather coarse-grained limestone, which is very different from the fine Theban one, might suggest a place in Middle or Lower Egypt.

    Expert: Dr. Helmut Satzinger, Professor of Egyptology, University of Vienna
    Former Keeper of ‘The Egyptian and Near Eastern Collection’,
    Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

    Estimate: € 20000 - 28000
    10 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    9 000 €

    Lot: 62

    Sycamore wood, remains of paint, minimal bump at the tip of the nose, otherwise completely intact
    height appx. 150 mm, width appx. 32 mm, depth appx. 26 mm
    Late period, XXVI dynasty around 600 B.C., but perhaps much earlier, from Sais or Saqqara
    Provenance: Private collection Austria
    Certificate of Authenticity Charles Ede no. 4775T

    Regardless of its outwardly simple appearance, this statuette made of sycamore wood (more difficult to work than other types of wood because of its very fibrous structure) is undoubtedly one of the finest examples of ancient Egyptian wood portraits known to this day. Sycamores had cultic meaning, for example Hathor was considered the mistress of the southern sycamores.

    How the artist succeeded in using bronze tools (or were they already made of iron?) to carve out such fine details as ears, eyes, eye cut and brows, nose and mouth, without even a single wood fibre breaking or tearing, must command the highest admiration from every viewer. The four sons of Horus were first mentioned in the Old Kingdom in the pyramid texts (at Teti and Pepi), where they are described as friends of the king, who are supposed to help him ascend to heaven after his death.

    Here the human-headed Amset (also vocalized as Imsti or Imseti) is depicted, whose task was to protect the liver removed during the embalming process. The south was also attributed to him as the point of the compass, so in the tomb he always stood on the southern side of the sarcophagus.

    If he had not already been made as a canopic jar, which was to contain the liver of the deceased, the predominant form of his depiction was that of a flat amulet, which was inserted between the bandages at the place where the liver was found when bandaging the mummy. As a statuette in mummy form like here it is very rare.

    Expert: Dr. Helmut Satzinger, Professor of Egyptology, University of Vienna
    Former Keeper of ‘The Egyptian and Near Eastern Collection’, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

    Literature: W. Seipel hrsg., “Ägypten, Götter, Gräber und die Kunst”, Ausstellungskatalog Linz 1989, Nr. 109

    Estimate: € 18000 - 26000
    9 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    12 000 €

    Lot: 63

    Bronze full cast, green malachite and cuprite patina,
    the broken off right lower leg is supplemented by a copy of the left one
    Height appx. 295 mm, width appx. 55 mm, depth appx. 67 mm
    Late period, probably XXV-XXVI dynasty 700-600 BC
    Provenance: Charles Ede 1980s, private collection Austria

    The Egyptian imperial god Amun-Rê can be recognized by his human figure and his very characteristic headgear which consists of a helmet in the shape of the Lower Egyptian national crown and two high feathers built up above it with a sun disk in front of it to form a feather crown. The two feathers symbolise his original nature as the god of the wind, while the inserted sun disk indicates his fusion with the sun god Rê. In this personal union Amun-Rê becomes the most powerful of all gods of Egypt.

    A further attribute of his divine being is the long, plaited and at the end slightly upward bent beard of the god, which is connected with the neck by a bridge (here, however, perhaps only a cast-technical characteristic). Both the neck collar and the apron pleat are carefully and detailed. Under the patronage of Amun-Rê, the Theban manifestation of the sun god, the empire extended to Black Africa and the Near East. The Theban priesthood purposefully used Amun-Rê to legitimize their rivalry against the king.

    The statuette was allegedly found around 1900 in Memphis, the missing right lower leg was only added in England. The impressive and in this size also rare statue is from the Kings College Collection in Cambridge.

    Expert: Dr. Helmut Satzinger, Professor of Egyptology, University of Vienna
    Former Keeper of ‘The Egyptian and Near Eastern Collection’,
    Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

    Literature: Kurt Sethe, “Amun und die acht Urgötter”, Leipzig 1929
    E. Otto, “Egyptian art and the cults of Osiris and Amun”, London 1968
    J. Assmann, “Rê und Amun, Die Krise des polytheistischen Weltbildes im
    Ägypten der XVIII.-XX. Dynastie”, Freiburg / Göttingen 1983
    G. Roeder, “Ägyptische Bronzefiguren”, Berlin 1956, S. 34, vgl. 57a.
    Ägyptische Kunst aus dem Brooklyn Museum, Ausstellungskatalog Berlin 1976, Nr. 61
    Richard Fazzini, “Images for Eternity”, Brooklyn 1975, Nr. 87

    Estimate: € 25000 - 35000
    12 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    7 500 €

    Lot: 64

    Stele: green faience, a not continuous drying crack across the plate, framing partly slightly bumped
    Height appx. 90 mm, width appx. 60 mm, depth appx. 10 mm
    Statuette: dark green faience, multiple fractures, splinters
    Height appx. 80 mm, width appx. 30 mm, depth appx. 22 mm
    Late period, perhaps XXVI dynasty around 600 BC or earlier
    Provenance: Private collection Austria

    The first piece belongs to the group of Horus steles, which, through the magical powers of their protect pictures and inscriptions against the bites and poisons of various dangerous animals to which the people of ancient Egypt in general, but especially their children, were exposed on a daily basis. Therefore, Horus is depicted on these steles as a child (Harpocrates = Horus the child), who according to mythology was rescued and healed from such a life-threatening danger by his magical mother Isis with the support of the gods Re and Thot.

    Here Horus stands in childlike nudity with a curl of hair on the side and Uraeus on his forehead on two crocodiles. In his hands he holds other dangerous animals such as snakes, scorpions and the like, representative of all the others, to his right is a springbok clearly recognizable as such, to his left a kind of oar, probably against all the dangers of the water.

    Below the picture there is a high pedestal with incised representations of gods and extensive magical texts, which are continued on the outside around the frame. They contain invocations of the gods and requests for protection and defense against evil forces, such as: repel from me every lion in the desert, every crocodile in the river, all snakes, etc. The immediate protection of the stele was also gained by letting water run over it, which could be collected in a container and then drunk if, for some reason, you were not in the vicinity but felt endangered.

    Literature: Richard Fazzini, “Images for Eternity: Egyptian Art from Berkeley and Brooklyn”, Brooklyn 1975, no. 114
    Heike Sternberg-el Hotabi, “Zwei Horusstelen aus einer österreichischen Privatsammlung”,
    Göttinger Miszellen, Hefte 97/1987, S. 25, bzw. 194/2003, S. 65

    The representation of the statuette is based on the same iconography, but it has not survived the past two and a half thousand years so well. Despite its considerable damage, it shows all the protective elements indicated on the stele in the same way.

    Unlike the latter, however, it refers directly to the magical and healing mother Isis herself, who as an incised image literally covers her child’s back and is represented here with a cow’s head. In the papyrus Sallier it is described that Isis received a cow’s head from Thot after Horus had torn his mother’s head off in anger.

    Expert: Dr. Helmut Satzinger, Professor of Egyptology, University of Vienna
    Former Keeper of ‘The Egyptian and Near Eastern Collection’, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

    Estimate: € 15000 - 20000
    7 500 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    20 000 €

    Lot: 65

    Slightly veined, but in all other respects homogeneously yellow calcite-alabaster, in places minimal abrasion on the surface, especially in the facial area, the haptic saponification of smooth surface parts, typical for antique limestones such as marble or calcite-alabaster, as well as a small, irregular cavity on the left side of the base, caused by weathering, plausibly prove the age of the statuette
    Height appx. 270 mm, width appx. 85 mm, depth appx. 70 mm
    New Kingdom, Thebes, XVIII. Dynasty around 1400 BC
    Provenance: Dr. Nassim, 1976, private collection Austria

    The unusually carefully cut calcite Ushebti stands on a low, square base, wears the braided beard and a large wig striped lengthwise, in the hands crossed in front of the chest it holds both tools, on the body lie six lines traditionally inscribed horizontally with hieroglyphics. The back pillar, however, is described vertically and names Kenamun as owner, administrator and guardian of the treasures in the temples of Amun.

    The fact that this is most likely Kenamun (Ken-Amun), son of the court lady and royal nurse Amenemopet, a milk brother, closest friend of his youth and later chief administrator of the estates of Amenophis II (1427-1400 B.C.), whose tomb in Thebes (TT 93) has been known for more than two hundred years already and consequently has been plundered to a large extent, is clear from the known circumstances of the find.

    The text on his body seems to deviate from the otherwise commonly used 6th chapter from the Book of the Dead. The remarkable size of the Ushabti, the especially pure quality of the calcite alabaster, as well as the exact execution of figure and inscription allow in any case conclusions about the importance of Kenamun at the court of Amenophis II. The stone most probably comes from the pharaonic calcite pits of Hatnub.

    Expert: Dr. Helmut Satzinger, Professor of Egyptology, University of Vienna
    Former Keeper of ‘The Egyptian and Near Eastern Collection’, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

    Literature: Norman De Garis Davies,
    “The Tomb of Ken-Amun at Thebes”
    2 volumes, London 1930

    Estimate: € 40000 - 60000
    20 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    17 000 €

    Lot: 66

    Limestone, ochre and red painted countersunk relief, as a ca. 28 mm thick plate
    apparently only in recent times sawed off from the rear part, some fractures repaired
    Height appx. 267 mm, width appx. 112 mm
    Middle Kingdom, XIII dynasty ca. 1750 BC
    Provenance: Charles Ede, 1977, private collection Austria

    The stele, rounded at the top, is an example of the religious needs of wealthy families during the period of the decline of the empire towards the end of the XII. century. Dynasty. The format of the Stele is extraordinarily narrow. The four-line inscription under Shen-ring and Udjat eyes consists of a standard sacrificial formula: A gift the king offered to Ptah-Sokar-Osiris: May they make an invocation offering consisting of bread, beer, beef, poultry, alabaster vessels (with oil), linen, incense and ointment for the soul of the Wab priest of the Chapel of Souls, Sebekhotep, the Righteous.

    Below, on the left, the owner of the stele, Sebekhotep, is depicted and on the right, a man whom the vertical inscription identifies as the ‘judge and mouth of Nechen’, Hedjery. Their relationship is not indicated, Hedjery may be a son of Sebekhotep. The stele was demonstrably decorated by the same artist as seven other steles and also two statues. These two persons are also known from other monuments, namely from one stele each in Cairo, in the British Museum in London and in Philadelphia. Another stele in Cairo and one in Berlin belong to the same group.

    The origin of one of the steles in Cairo is documented: Lord Carnavon and Howard Carter discovered it in the necropolis of Asasîf in Thebes (1907-1911). It is therefore a real funerary stele, and not a so-called Abydos stele. These are inscription stones that were erected in great numbers at this place of worship and pilgrimage of the god Osiris: most of the other stelae of the Middle Kingdom originate from there.

    Expert: Dr. Helmut Satzinger, Professor of Egyptology, University of Vienna
    Former Keeper of ‘The Egyptian and Near Eastern Collection’, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

    Literature: Marcel Marée, “An Artist, a Priest and their Clients in Late 13th Dynasty Thebes”,
    British Museum Studies in Ancient Egypt and Sudan 15, 2010.

    Estimate: € 35000 - 50000
    17 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    20 000 €

    Lot: 67

    Sycamore wood, painted yellow, white, red and black, painting partly rubbed off,
    one horn of the right cattle broken off and lost, fossil plant and mineral deposits
    Total height appx. 170 mm, size of the rectangular base plate appx. 315 x 215 mm
    Middle Kingdom, XII. Dynasty around 1800 BC.
    Provenance: Sayyed Molattam, Luxor, private collection Austria

    The farmer walks behind the characteristic hook plough pulled by two cattle, like it is still in use today everywhere in Egypt, and will immediately replace it with the left press down hand while he swings the whip in the right one and drives the cattle.

    Numerous depictions of this scene have already been handed down on grave reliefs from the Old Empire, but they were only executed in full plastic and wood from the Middle Kingdom onwards.

    Remarkable is the care with which the respective position of the ploughman and cattle on the floor slab was determined. Not enough that each foot and each hoof had its own recess in it, the figure of the Fellah was made without forefeet, these were carved separately, attached directly to the plate and the legs were inserted directly behind it. Even for the ploughshare itself, a precisely fitting recess was carved, which not only provides support for the tool, but also enhances the illusion of ploughing.

    Expert: Dr. Helmut Satzinger, Professor of Egyptology, University of Vienna
    Former Keeper of ‘The Egyptian and Near Eastern Collection’, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

    Literature:
    Wilfried Seipel hrsg.,
    “Ägypten, Götter, Gräber und die Kunst”, Ausstellungskatalog Linz 1989, Nr. 72, Nr. 74
    J. Vandier, “Manuel d‘archéologie égyptienne VI, Scènes de la vie agricole à l‘ancien et au moyen empire”, Paris 1978
    W. Wetterstrom, “Foraging and farming in Egypt: The transition from hunting and gathering to horticulture in the Nile valley”, in:
    T. Shaw, “The archeology of Africa”, London 1993, pp. 165-226
    K. Baer, “An eleventh dynasty farmer‘s letter to his family”, Journal of the American Oriental Society, 83, 1983

    Estimate: € 40000 - 60000
    20 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    4 000 €

    Lot: 68

    Cast bronze, more grainy green, bluish, gray patina and also earth-colored sinterings, made of stretched remains of the original gilding (in the auction catalogue of Sotheby’s London as overcleaned denotes. Possibly an old(?) repair under stronger incrustation outside at the shoulder of the reveal
    Height appx. 395 mm, diameter appx. 180 mm
    Western Han period, 206 BC - 8 AD.
    Provenance: Sotheby’s London 1994, from an old English private collection, private collection Austria

    This bottle-shaped Hu, characteristic of the Han period, with a long, cylindrical spout thickened to a garlic bulb shape at the end, belongs to a group of ritual vessels that have only become popular in recent years.

    In older books on archaic bronze, such as Bernhard Karlgren, Catalogue of the Nathanael Wessén Collection, Stockholm 1969 or Christian Deydier, Chinese Bronzes, New York 1980, this form is not mentioned. Garlic (suan) has been considered in China since ancient times as the most effective defense against the five poisons (snake, scorpion, centipede, lizard or gecko and toad) and as a lucky plant, symbol of numerous descendants and of great importance in the ritual of the festival on the fifth day of the fifth month around the time of the summer solstice.

    The best comparison piece for this type of vessel is in: Jessica Rawson/Emma Bunker, Ancient Chinese and Ordos Bronzes, Hong Kong 1990, on p. 53, Fig. 46. There it is claimed that this remarkable vessel shape was first used in Shaanxi and may have originally come from Western China. Compared to the most important older types of vessels, however, this is a vessel of naïve simplicity. This naive simplicity seems to have been adopted voluntarily when the Qin conquered central China and imported this type of vessel from the provinces of Henan and Hubei.

    Further comparative pieces can be found in: Zhongguo qingtongqi quanji, The Complete Collection of Chinese Bronzes, Beijing 1998, Vol. 12, No. 3, p. 3 and No. 6 and 7, p. 6 and 7 and Yoshikawa Kobukan, Shunju Sengoku Jidai Seiki No Konkyu, 1989, p. 111.

    Estimate: € 8000 - 12000
    4 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    4 000 €

    Lot: 69

    Cast bronze, blue green, in places also brown patina, malachite and rich azurite incrustations,
    Below it, the original gilding is visible in large areas with a matt shimmer,
    Height appx. 385 mm, diameter appx. 200 mm
    Later Eastern Chou period (Warring States) 481-256 B.C.
    Provenance: Sotheby’s London 1994, from an old English private collection, private collection Austria

    This unusual, pear-shaped vessel with a flower or crown-shaped top displays four horizontal strings of bowstrings as decoration, with two curved handles in the form of horn-bearing dragons vaulting over the uppermost one.

    The rings that were probably originally present are missing. On the spout is a flower-shaped attachment with line decoration. This attachment is used in Bo Gyllenswärd, The First Floral Patterns on Chinese Bronzes, Stockholm 1962, No. 34, on pp. 29-47, and a Hu with a similar attachment is shown schematically.

    A further comparative piece in the Royal Ontario Museum can be found in W. Thomas Chase, Ancient Chinese Bronze Art, Casting the precious Sacral Vessel, China House Gallery 1991, no. 25 on p. 62. In contrast to the piece presented here it bears on its outer wall a long inscription and fine relief, the flower-like attachment was worked in openwork.

    Estimate: € 8000 - 12000
    4 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    2 500 €

    Lot: 70

    Cast bronze, partly malachite green, partly grey and earth-coloured patina and stronger incrustations
    Height appx. 115 mm, Width incl. bolts appx. 115 mm, diameter appx. 49 mm
    Later Western Chou period around 900-800 BC
    Provenance: Collection Susan Chen, Hong Kong 1980s, private collection Austria

    Both slightly conical fittings carry two circular bands with stylised, intertwined dragons (panchi), on the flat cap an ornament that cannot be further classified and are still provided with a leiwen band below the cap. Both have two slots each for still existing bolts, each of which wear a tiger’s head.

    Almost identical specimens are in: Zhongguo qingtongqi quanji (The Complete Collection of Chinese Bronzes), Editing Committee ed., Cultural Relics Publishing House (Beijing) 1994, vol. 7 as no. 54 on pp. 56/57, a further comparative piece, however dated much later, at Jessica Rawson/Emma Bunker, Ancient Chinese and Ordos Bronzes, Hong Kong 1994, on pp. 168/9, no. 70, illustrated and described.

    Estimate: € 5000 - 7000
    2 500 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    4 000 €

    Lot: 71

    Cast bronze, large parts of malachite patina and some earth encrustation,
    Length appx. 330 mm, height appx. 85 mm, depth appx. 45 mm
    Eastern Chou period, probably spring and autumn period 722-481 BC
    Provenance: Sotheby’s London 1993, thereafter Gallery Asboth, private collection Austria

    The elongated, stylized animal with relatively short and stocky legs with spiral-shaped curls and pointed claw ends turns its head, which sits on a long neck, backwards, the elongated tail is rolled up at the end. The small, pointed ears resemble horns, the spherical eyes seem to be set on. The clay core of the cast has been largely preserved.

    Similar zoomorphic handles on large bronze hoods are known from the spring and autumn period, two practically identical specimens from the National Palace Museum in Taipei were on display there in 1989: Bronze Wine Vessels of Shang and Chou Dynasties, Catalogue pp. 69-70.

    Estimate: € 8000 - 12000
    4 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    2 000 €

    Lot: 72

    Cast bronze, green patina and some incrustations
    Length appx. 160 mm, high appx. 60 mm, depth appx. 40 mm
    Later Eastern Chou time (Battling kingdoms), 481-256 B.C.
    Provenance: Sotheby’s London 1995, private collection Austria

    The well modelled animal, whose flanks are decorated with raised motifs and not, as was often the case at the time, with engraved cloud and spiral motifs, turns its gaze backwards over its curved back, its thick tail is curled.Presumably such pieces served as handles of vessels.

    A dragon very similar to this one from the same period is in: Jessica Rawson, Western Zhou Ritual Bronzes from the Arthur M. Sackler Collections, Vol. II, p. 122. S-shaped dragons are documented at least until the Western Chou period, are based on the totem of the lung rain dragon and are often called pan lung wen in this specifically curved form, see: James Legge, Shi king, 1893, Vol. II, S. 378.

    Estimate: € 4000 - 6000
    2 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    1 000 €

    Lot: 73

    Cast bronze, painted(?), malachite green and brownish patina, occasional earth incrustations
    Length appx. 125 mm, high appx. 52 mm, depth appx. 18 mm
    Ordos or Western Han period, around 200 BC.
    Provenance: Sotheby’s London 1992, private collection Austria

    The belt buckle is worked in the shape of a winged Ch’ilong dragon in a pierced jump, with the middle part of the triple-split tail turned into a hook. The casting and depiction of movement are excellently executed, a delicate pin had certainly been soldered to the base only in recent times.

    A convincing, but simpler comparison piece can be found in: William Watson, Ancient Chinese Bronzes, London 1962/77, No. 80 b and another similar one in: Jessica Rawson/Emma Bunker, Ancient Chinese and Ordos Bronzes, Hong Kong 1990, No. 129, It is not clear whether it was made in Mongolia or north-west China.

    Estimate: € 2000 - 4000
    1 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    7 000 €

    Lot: 74

    Cast bronze and gilded, with integrated cowrie shell, two small damages on the upper side of the shell
    Length appx. 92 mm, high appx. 50 mm, depth appx. 60 mm
    late western or early eastern Han period ca.100 B.C. - 100 A.D.
    Provenance: Private collection Hong Kong, Sotheby’s 1993, E&J Frankel, private collection Austria

    Unusually rare and, in contrast to most of the few comparative pieces, excellently preserved representation of the symbol of Long Life. The cowrie shell with its spotted surface is reminiscent of the fur of a gazelle and represents the back of the crouching animal, the head, the antlers attached to the back and the extremities are cast in situ in bronze and fire gilded.

    What remains a mystery is the technique of casting the bronze, which is heated to 800°C, in such a way that the shell did not shatter, as the production was undoubtedly carried out in a single operation. This piece seems to be the probably most finely executed and best preserved of its kind so far.

    The most frequent damage naturally concerns the delicate shell, in most cases it is missing completely, as in the case of the piece in the 700-year-old Marco Polo Exhibition, Venice 1954, Kempe Collection, cat. No. 157 and both from the Falcon Collection, currently in the Art Institute in Chicago.

    Estimate: € 15000 - 22000
    7 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    4 000 €

    Lot: 75

    Cast bronze, dark grey-green patina and individual incrustations
    Diameter appx. 120 mm, depth appx. 12 mm
    Six dynasties, ca. 4th to 5th century
    Provenance: Dr. Hugh Shire, Sotheby’s London 1996, private collection Austria

    The excellently cast mirror, heavy for its size, bears dragon and tiger motifs around the central pommel, framed by a band with inscriptions. Inside the clearly raised edge there are three borders with dog’s tooth motif.

    In addition to the exact casting, the beautiful glass-like surface catches the eye, possibly the result of special composition of the bronze alloy or local soil conditions during storage.

    Estimate: € 8000 - 12000
    4 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    6 000 €

    Lot: 76

    Partially gold-plated silver plate embossed (repoussé) in several parts, soldered on the narrow sides, the
    Silver clearly blackened, at the soldered seam black patina with single malachite coloured spots, probably caused by the use of copper-containing solder
    Height appx. 280 mm, width appx. 170 mm, depth appx. 105 mm
    Probably T’ang time 618-907 A.D., but maybe Liao time 907-1125 A.D.
    Provenance: Sotheby’s London 1995, private collection Austria

    Two phoenixes rise on each of the two sides of the show with magnificent, sweeping spread tail feathers, between them a flower, possibly a magnolia, and cloud or wave motives. Birds and flowers were highlighted by fire gilding.

    On the upper edge next to the spout, two gilded monkeys sit in front of the eyelets for the suspension.
    This is undoubtedly a very characteristic object for the presumed time of origin, for which the Xi’an Museum has excellent comparative pieces made of silver, also partially gilded. For example, the famous bowl with the dancing horse in the same technique, which has been shown in many exhibitions, including in Europe and America, and is depicted in most books about the so-called Golden Age in Chang’an.

    There are also the later, also rare, but somewhat more common than those made of silver, versions in green or ochre glazed ceramics, mainly from the Liao period. See also the quite revealing remark in the auction catalogue of Sotheby’s in London: A Private Collection of Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art, December 8th, 1995, lot 359:
    ‘...It is extremely rare to find a flask of this type with two applied figures...’

    Estimate: € 12000 - 18000
    6 000 €
Showing 61 - 76 of 76 items