APRIL 25TH 2020

ANCIENT ART OF EGYPT
ANCIENT CHINESE BRONZE
FINE ANTIQUE ORIENTAL RUGS XIX

Auction: April 25th 2020, 4pm
Preview: April 23rd and 24th from 11am to 6pm, April 25th from 11am to 4pm

APRIL 25TH 2020 There are 76 Lots.

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Showing 41 - 60 of 76 items
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    300 €

    Lot: 41

    140 x 88 cm (4’ 7” x 2’ 11”)
    Persia, early 20th century
    Condition: good, corroded brown, scattered low pile, lower end partially incomplete and frayed
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 800 - 1200
    300 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    500 €

    Lot: 42

    139 x 94 cm (4’ 7” x 3’ 1”)
    Uzbekistan, late 19th century
    Condition: very good, minimally stained
    Silk on silk

    Estimate: € 1000 - 1600
    500 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    1 000 €

    Lot: 43

    113 x 79 cm (3’ 8” x 2’ 7”)
    Caucasus, ca. 1880
    Condition: good, scattered low pile, signs of use at sides, minor small repairs
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 2000 - 3000
    1 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    6 000 €

    Lot: 44

    88 x 45 cm (2’ 11” x 1’ 6”)
    Turkmenistan, ca. 1870
    Condition: very good, full pile, selvages partially rebound and partially minimally damaged
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    In 1988, at the ‘Carpets of Central Asia’ symposium held in Leningrad, Dr Jon Thompson gave a memorable paper, regrettably unpublished, on Turkmen pile bags or trappings of this art historically important ‘birds within roundels’ design type. It is one of the rarest Turkmen designs documented: no more than about ten examples are known, with even fewer in print, and the present lot is only the second to come to the auction market. It belongs to a wider group of structurally and chromatically distinctive Yomut family Turkmen tribal weavings that, since the publication in 1990 of A. and V. Rautenstengel and S. Azadi’s monograph Studien zur Teppichkultur der Turkmen, have generally come to be known under the ‘eagle-göl’ group label.
    Birds within octagons (pearl roundels) is a classic pan-Asian design that may have entered the Turkmen vocabulary from an earlier Central Asian (Sogdian) textile tradition. The relationship between Sogdian textile design and aspects of later Turkmen iconography was discussed at length by Jürg Rageth in ‘Turkmen Carpets, A New Perspective (2016)’.
    A very similar piece from the Alan and Beverly Gilbert Collection, but with twelve rather than the six octagons containing avian figures seen here, appears in Louise Mackie & Jon Thompson’s Turkmen exhibition catalogue (Textile Museum, Washington DC, 1980, pl.57, p.138). A nine-octagon example was sold at Locke & England auctioneers of Leamington Spa in the English Midlands in March 2011 (lot 97, see HALI 168, p.145), while a Yomut ten-göl kapunuk of similar design, formerly in the collection of the Asgabat Museum of Art, appears in Carpets of the People of Central Asia, the O’Bannon and Amanova-Olsen edition of Valentina G. Moshkova’s classic work (1996, fig. 109, page 255)

    Estimate: € 12000 - 18000
    6 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    2 000 €

    Lot: 45

    203 x 149 cm (6’ 8” x 4’ 11”)
    Persia, second half 19th century
    Condition: used, fragile, scattered low pile, several tears and holes, mounted on wooden board
    Warp: silk, weft: silk, pile: silk
    Provenance: Abdi Roubeni collection

    Estimate: € 4000 - 6000
    2 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    1 200 €

    Lot: 46

    198 x 128 cm (6’ 6” x 4’ 2”)
    Romania, ca. 1920
    Condition: good, low pile, both ends slightly incomplete, selvages rebound, scattered small old repairs
    Warp: cotton, weft: cotton, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 1800 - 2600
    1 200 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    1 500 €

    Lot: 47

    191 x 143 cm (6’ 3” x 4’ 8”)
    Caucasus, ca. 1880
    Condition: very good, full pile, minor small repairs
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 3000 - 4000
    1 500 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    1 000 €

    Lot: 48

    267 x 150 cm (8’ 9” x 4’ 11”)
    Caucasus, late 19th century
    Condition: good, both ends slightly restored, scattered small repairs, slight signs of use
    Warp: wool, weft: wool

    Estimate: € 2000 - 3000
    1 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    4 000 €

    Lot: 49

    280 x 207 cm (9’ 2” x 6’ 9”)
    Caucasus, late 19th century
    Condition: very good, full pile, scattered small repairs
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 7000 - 10000
    4 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    1 000 €

    Lot: 50

    265 x 138 cm (8’ 8” x 4’ 6”)
    Persia, ca. 1900
    Condition: good, scattered low pile, minor small repairs
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 2000 - 3000
    1 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    1 000 €

    Lot: 51

    128 x 109 cm (4’ 2” x 3’ 7”)
    Caucasus, ca. 1880
    Condition: good, low pile, both ends slightly restored, minor small repairs
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 2000 - 3000
    1 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    1 000 €

    Lot: 52

    174 x 126 cm (5’ 9” x 4’ 2”)
    Caucasus, ca. 1880
    Condition: good, low pile, both ends restored, selvages rebound, scattered small repairs
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 2000 - 3000
    1 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    1 500 €

    Lot: 53

    126 x 73 cm (4’ 2” x 2’ 5”)
    Turkmenistan, second half 19th century
    Condition: good, low pile, minor small repairs
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 3000 - 4000
    1 500 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    600 €

    Lot: 54

    153 x 34 cm (5’ x 1’ 1”)
    Turkmenistan, second half 19th century
    Condition: very good, minor signs of use, selvages rebound
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 1200 - 1600
    600 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    2 000 €

    Lot: 55

    Relatively fine-grained rose granite, except for the gouged(?) Ankh on Ma’ats knee intact, not perforated
    Length appx. 40 mm, width appx. 26 mm, depth appx. 19 mm
    New Kingdom, XVIII. Dynasty, 1380 - 1350 BC
    Provenance: Estate of Roman Vishniac, New York 1990,
    E&J Frankel, New York 2011, private collection Austria

    The belly side shows very clearly Amenophis’ III throne name Neb-ma’at-Ra. The finely modelled fields of the Ma’at, the (presumably) chiseled Ankh and the perforated sun disk shifted to the right seem striking.

    Expert: Dr. Helmut Satzinger, Professor of Egyptology, University of Vienna; Former Keeper of ‘The Egyptian and Near Eastern Collection’, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

    Lit: Aude Gros de Beler, “Götter und Göttinnen Ägyptens”,
    Köln 2001, p. 119, Maria Carmela Betrò, “Heilige Zeichen”, Wiesbaden 2003, p. 151

    Estimate: € 4000 - 6000
    2 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    4 000 €

    Lot: 56

    Cast gold, chased, chased and filigree, dented inplaces
    Longitudinal oval, appx. 95 x 75 mm, depth appx. 17 mm, 84 Gr.
    Egypt or Near East (Persia?), 1.- 4. century AD.
    Provenance: Private collection Vienna 1999, private collection Austria

    Not only in Egypt, where the ram originally took the form of the creator god Chnum and later, but then with downward curved horns, as the holy animal of Amun. While the bull was not only venerated but also spread throughout the entire Near East region as far as Persia, it was the focus of cultic activities alongside the bull as a symbol of fertility. Moreover, the protective effect of the bull was used in amulets and jewellery.

    This charming piece of jewellery made of finely worked gold, which besides its decorative also had ritual function, shows at the ends of the clasp, which is chased and soldered as a hollow tube, a ram’s head with downward bent, rolled horns, thus it belongs to Amun. The soldered filigree below the cast heads could give an indication of his or the jeweller possible Near Eastern provenance, but this should not speak against an Egyptian one, at least a strong Persian-Sassanid influence is to be assumed.

    Expert: Dr. Helmut Satzinger, Professor of Egyptology, University of Vienna
    Former Keeper of ‘The Egyptian and Near Eastern Collection’, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

    Literature: Manfred Lurker, “Symbole der alten Ägypter”, Weilheim / Obb., 1964, p. 56 and p. 133

    Estimate: € 8000 - 12000
    4 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    4 000 €

    Lot: 57

    Turquoise glazed faience
    Height appx. 165 mm, width appx. 40 mm, depth appx. 19 mm
    Late period, XXVI-XXX Dynasty around 600-300 BC
    Provenance: Private collection Austria
    Charles Ede Certificate of Authenticity no. 5558

    The rattling instrument mainly used in the cult of Hathor possibly goes back to an old custom to set a tuft of dried papyrus plants into rustling motion by fast and rhythmic shaking in honour of the goddess. Two different forms were used: either bow or naos sistrum.

    The one here is a Naos sistrum: Above the handle with a (hardly decipherable) hieroglyphic inscription, which probably gives the name of the temple dancer, there is a portrait of Hathor with a long wig, broad necklace (Aegis) and her characteristic cow ears on both sides. On her head she wears the mentioned Naos, which has three perforations for bronze rods on each side, on which small round metal plates were threaded.

    Expert: Dr. Helmut Satzinger, Professor of Egyptology, University of Vienna
    Former Keeper of ‘The Egyptian and Near Eastern Collection’, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

    Literature: Christiane Ziegler, “Catalogue des instruments de musique égyptiens”, Paris 1979, pp. 31-40

    Estimate: € 8000 - 12000
    4 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    6 000 €

    Lot: 58

    Blue faience (because of the weight: Egyptian blue?) three matching pieces, unmarked, intact
    Total width appx. 185 mm, height and depth of the scarab: 68 mm x 15 mm
    Late period, XXVI dynasty around 600 BC
    Provenance: Collection Dr. Rotter, Salzburg 1981, private collection Austria

    Characteristic for the late period, in which faith and hope for a better life in the beyond already was a little bit in the faltering, is the high esteem for amulets. One of the most popular ones was already from ancient times the scarab (ateuchus sacer). In its special appearance with spread wings it carried the name Api and was, similar to the Ba-bird, often sewn onto the mummy’s linen bandages. With its magical power it was supposed to protect the dead, warm them and give them light in the darkness of the underworld, because in the course of time Api also became a manifestation of the sun god Rê-Cheprê. In his normal form, however, he embodied the hope of rebirth. The immense need for magical amulets against all dangers of daily and otherworldly life made a fast and cheap manufacturing process necessary, for which faience was particularly suitable. In contrast to European faience, the Egyptian quartz sand ground as a basic substance contains no clay and no tin in the glaze. A particularly similar specimen can be found in the Brooklyn Museum under inv. no. 49.28.

    Expert: Dr. Helmut Satzinger, Professor of Egyptology, University of Vienna
    Former Keeper of ‘The Egyptian and Near Eastern Collection’, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

    Literature: Elizabeth Riefstahl, “Glass and Glazes”, Brooklyn 1968, Nr. 66, S. 68
    Richard Fazzini, “Images for Eternity”, Brooklyn 1975, Nr. 111
    “Ägyptische Kunst aus dem Brooklyn Museum”, Ausstellungskatalog Berlin 1976, Nr. 86
    Wilfried Seipel hrsg., “Ägypten, Götter, Gräber und die Kunst”, Ausstellungskatalog Linz 1989, Nr. 303

    Estimate: € 12000 - 18000
    6 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    5 000 €

    Lot: 59

    Green glazed faience, partly slightly bumped
    Height appx. 125 mm, width appx. 35 mm, depth appx. 25 mm
    Late period, XXV-XXVI dynasty around 700-600 BC
    Provenance: Swiss private collection 1992, private collection Austria

    The Ushabti, inscribed with seven horizontal text fields, corresponds to the late period type. She has a mummy figure with a long wig, ceremonial beard, back pillar and tools.

    Expert: Dr. Helmut Satzinger, Professor of Egyptology, University of Vienna
    Former Keeper of ‘The Egyptian and Near Eastern Collection’, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

    Literature: Wilfried Seipel hrsg., “Ägypten, Götter, Gräber und die Kunst”, Ausstellungskatalog Linz 1989, Nrs. 214-293

    Estimate: € 10000 - 15000
    5 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    9 000 €

    Lot: 60

    Acacia or cedar wood, carved and polychrome painted, on the back three holes for holding pegs for
    Attachment to the mummy cover, a small, moderately worn area at the vertex
    Height appx. 250 mm, width appx. 200 mm, depth appx. 100 mm
    Probably late New Kingdom around 1100-1000 BC
    Provenance: Selim Dere, Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, 1996, private collection Austria

    The extraordinarily good state of preservation and the still freshly coloured polychrome painting of the head part of a lady’s mummy cover are very remarkable. Her expressive, but undoubtedly idealized face shows big eyes with long, blue painted eyebrows and the same cosmetic lines as they were used for the New Kingdom are characteristic, straight nose and full lips over narrow chin. The wig is held together by a wide hair band decorated with multicoloured dots and stripes, above is a diadem of floral motifs with a lotus flower in the middle. Since no inscription can be proven, nothing more can be said about the identity of the sitter (from analogies with inscribed examples it will probably be a lady) or the place of manufacture of the sarcophagus, but the manner of execution clearly speaks for its origin in Thebes between later XIX and XXI dynasties. An in every respect convincing comparison piece with similar features, certainly from the same period, had been offered at Sotheby’s in New York on June 8, 1994 as lot 54.

    Expert: Dr. Helmut Satzinger, Professor of Egyptology, University of Vienna
    Former Keeper of ‘The Egyptian and Near Eastern Collection’, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

    Literature: Katalog des Ägyptischen Museums in Kairo, Mainz 1986, No. 218
    “Ägypten, Augenblicke der Ewigkeit”, Basel/Genf 1997, p. 198/9, No. 130
    W. Seipel hrsg., “Götter, Gräber u. d. Kunst”, Ausstellungs-Kat. Linz 1989, p. 140, No. 105

    Estimate: € 18000 - 26000
    9 000 €
Showing 41 - 60 of 76 items