APRIL 25TH 2020

ANCIENT ART OF EGYPT
ANCIENT CHINESE BRONZE
FINE ANTIQUE ORIENTAL RUGS XIX

Auction: April 25th 2020, 4pm
Preview: April 23rd and 24th from 11am to 6pm, April 25th from 11am to 4pm

APRIL 25TH 2020 There are 76 Lots.

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Showing 21 - 40 of 76 items
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    1 000 €

    Lot: 21

    164 x 127 cm (5’ 4” x 4’ 2”)
    Caucasus, datiert 1298 (1880)
    Condition: good, upper end incomplete, lower end partially incomplete, scattered low pile, minor small repairs
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 2000 - 3000
    1 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    3 000 €

    Lot: 22

    301 x 127 cm (9’ 11” x 4’ 2”)
    Caucasus, ca. 1870
    Condition: good, scattered low pile,
    scattered small repairs, overall in good condition
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 6000 - 8000
    3 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    6 000 €

    Lot: 23

    418 x 324 cm (13’ 9” x 10’ 8”)
    Persia, ca. 1870
    Condition: good, both ends slightly incomplete, scattered low pile, scattered small repairs, overall in very good condition
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 12000 - 18000
    6 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    4 000 €

    Lot: 24

    273 x 135 cm (8’ 11” x 4’ 5”)
    Turkey, mid 19th century
    Condition: good, scattered low pile, both ends slightly restored, selvages partially rebound, scattered small old repairs, overall in good condition
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 8000 - 12000
    4 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    4 000 €

    Lot: 25

    370 x 278 cm (12’ 2” x 9’ 1”)
    Caucasus, late 19th century
    Condition: very good, scattered small repairs and several small reweavings, overall in good condition
    Warp: wool, weft: wool

    Estimate: € 7000 - 9000
    4 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    600 €

    Lot: 26

    203 x 107 cm (6’ 8” x 3’ 6”)
    Persia, ca. 1900
    Condition: very good, good pile, lower end slightly restored, selvages rebound, scattered small repairs
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 1200 - 1800
    600 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    1 000 €

    Lot: 27

    176 x 139 cm (5’ 9” x 4’ 7”)
    Caucasus, late 19th century
    Condition: good, scattered low pile, several small repairs
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 2000 - 3000
    1 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    1 500 €

    Lot: 28

    216 x 138 cm (7’ 1’’ x 4’ 6’’)
    Persia, late 19th century
    Condition: very good, minor spots of low pile
    Warp: cotton, weft: cotton, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 3000 - 4000
    1 500 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    2 000 €

    Lot: 29

    189 x 119 cm (6’ 2’’ x 3’ 11’’)
    Persia, late 19th century
    Condition: very good, full pile, two small repairs in the field
    Warp: silk, weft: silk, pile: silk

    Estimate: € 4000 - 6000
    2 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    12 000 €

    Lot: 30

    162 x 66 cm (5’ 4” x 2’ 2”)
    Turkmenistan, ca. 1800 or before
    Condition: good according to age, scattered low pile, both ends partially incomplete, several small old repairs, one restored tear in the right field
    Warp: wool, weft: wool and cotton, pile: wool

    All these rare weavings of an apparently separated Yomut tribe are closely related to each other, they are now known under the provisional name Eagle Gul Group and are the subject of a comprehensive book by Anette Rautenstengel and Siawosch Azadi, “Kultur der Turkmenen”, Hilden 1990.

    There this animal trapping is illustrated and described under no. 26 and attributed to Eagle-göl group II.
    The archaic-looking piece has the structure that Jon Thompson (in “Turkmen Carpet Weavings”, London 1981, and “Magic Carpet”, London 1981) as Fine Brown Yomut: asymmetrical knot open to the right, deep brown-red ground colour and as weft threads a mixture of wool and cotton (1960 Jon Thompson had given this group the provisional name Imreli).

    This extremely rare, very large animal hanging for the bridal camel was exhibited at the V International Carpet Conference Vienna/Budapest in 1986, was illustrated in the catalogue under no. 116 and described by Robert Pinner.

    Estimate: € 25000 - 35000
    12 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    600 €

    Lot: 31

    210 x 134 cm (6’ 11” x 4’ 5”)
    Persia, early 20th century
    Condition: good, scattered low pile, minor small repairs, left selvage slightly damaged
    Warp: cotton, weft: cotton, pile: wool

    Estimate: € 1000 - 1600
    600 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    800 €

    Lot: 32

    146 x 93 cm (4’ 9” x 3’ 1”)
    Uzbekistan, ca. 1870
    Condition: good, greek embroidery implemented as center field, slightly stained, slight signs of use
    Silk on cotton
    Published: “Ottoman Embroidery”, Roderick Taylor, 1993, p. 135

    Estimate: € 1600 - 2400
    800 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    4 000 €

    Lot: 33

    279 x 149 cm (9’ 2” x 4’ 11”)
    Turkmenistan, first half 19th century
    Condition: good, scattered low pile, selvages rebound
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Although the design of this carpet is unusual it combines design elements that help to place its origin precisely. The borders are typical of 19th century Yomut weavings, as is the secondary gül but the major göl, referred to Azadi as the Karadashli gul, and the elem are very unusual.

    The Karadashli tribe were located at the southern area of the Aral Sea and further south in the Akhal Oasis from at least the 13th century, but these areas were later dominated by the Yomut in the 19th century and by the Chodor tribes, whose ertmen gül inspired the unique elem designs. Thus, by reading the histroy and design of this carpet correctly, this is a product of the intermingling of the three tribes in the first half of the 19th century before typical Yomut main carpet designs became the standard field patterns in the later part of the 19th century.

    Estimate: € 7000 - 10000
    4 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    7 000 €

    Lot: 34

    151 x 116 cm (4’ 11” x 3’ 10”)
    Turkey, 17th century
    Condition: according to age good, low pile, slightly incomplete all around, scattered small old repairs
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Prayer rugs with spandrels filled with arabesques and an Ottoman border come either with a red or beige field color. The larger part of this group has an indented mihrab. Some have even several indentations. Our example’s mihrab starts with a diagonal which turns to steps towards the top.

    None of the Transylvanian carpets show corner solutions for the main border. In this group the borders run like strips either horizontal or vertical. The floral ornamentation relates closely to the Ottoman court style.

    The same outer minor border can be found on a rug of this group in the Black Church in Brasov bearing the inscription ‘Schlosser Benkli Gehörig Täpig 1710’. See Stefano Ionescu, Antique Ottoman Rugs in Transylvania, cat. 154.

    A very closely related example but with red field was advertised by Sailer in Hali 55 page 69. The only other differences being are the inner minor border and a stronger indentation in the mihrab.

    Estimate: € 15000 - 22000
    7 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    20 000 €

    Lot: 35

    171 x 118 cm (5’ 7” x 3’ 10”)
    Turkey, 16th century
    Condition: good according to age, low pile, slightly incomplete all around, several old repairs
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    The pattern of this famous carpet, which has been published many times, is obviously derived from Persian miniature paintings of the 15th century, in which carpets are depicted.

    It was probably woven in Anatolia from the second half of the 15th century onwards. Of a total of twenty-six known examples, mostly fragmented, only seven, including the present one, are clearly from Ushak. This carpet differs from the other classic Ushaks in that its design is drawn in a small format.

    Also, the so-called wine glass border already appears in European paintings from the early 16th century onwards (for example in Maria Magdalena by Jacob Cornelisc from 1519, currently in the Art Museum of St. Louis.) The pattern scheme follows the archaic 4+1, the similarity of the central emblem with the Tibetan double vajra seems evident, although researchers tend to assume floral origins.

    This carpet comes from the private collection of Otto Bernheimer in Munich and is published by Kurt Erdmann:
    “Weniger bekannte Ushak-Muster, Kunst des Orients IV”, Wiesbaden, 1963, Page 92, Fig. 6, and in Michael Franses/Robert Pinner, “Turkish Carpets in the Victoria & Albert Museum, Part I”, The Classical Carpets of the 15–17th Century, in HALI Vol. 6, No. 4, 1984, pp. 356-381

    Estimate: € 40000 - 60000
    20 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    25 000 €

    Lot: 36

    249 x 198 cm (8’ 2” x 6’ 6”)
    Azerbaijan, late 17th or early 18th century
    Condition: very good according to age, corroded brown, selvages rebound, several small old repairs
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    Unusual for this carpet is not only the powerful and free drawing, but also the excellent state of preservation. Peter Bausback, Mannheim, described it on the occasion of his exhibition at the Textura 1992 in Maastricht (see also HALI, Issue 67, 1993) as follows: “In my opinion, this is an excellent specimen of this group, to which in quality, colour and expression no comparable piece is found”.

    The carpet was probably made in the 17th century in the Caucasus (in HALI 61, February 1992, the carpet is shown on p. 61 but is carefully conservative dated with 18th century) and resembles the early dragon carpets; it is much more expressive due to the powerful design of both the border and the field with the filling ornaments like people and animals. Very expressive are also the living dragon ornaments as the main motif of the carpet, whose center forms a grimace-like element.

    The carpet comes from a noble Central European house and I suspect that it once came to Europe via Transylvania. Unlike most of the other surviving dragon carpets, which come from manufactories, it is of undoubtedly village origin. Only in the Vakiflar Museum in Istanbul there is such a dragon village rug shown, corresponding in size, but in a deplorable condition. (In HALI 70, August 1993, all six known carpets belonging to this group are shown on page 140).

    In addition to the weaving technique with the rough back, the four white, stag-like animals around the center (including two blue ones on the edges in the upper field), are also found in Anatolian carpets of the 15th to 17th century, and the two large, blue C-shapes on the side of the central motif could indicate that this carpet was made in the 17th century.

    In later dragon carpets they are, if they exist at all, much smaller and inconspicuously used as mere filler ornament. In Hali 81 (June/July 1995), a fragment from the 18th century is found on p. 132, top left, similarly, though quite cursory, is referred to that in Murray L. Eiland, “Pacific Collections Seattle”, no. 227, is illustrated and described. This carpet was auctioned at Dorotheum in Vienna in 1988 and exhibited for the first time at the Munich Antiques Fair the same year.

    Estimate: € 60000 - 90000
    25 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    12 000 €

    Lot: 37

    86 x 56 cm (2’ 10” x 1’ 10”)
    Turkey, 17th century
    Condition: very good according to age, full pile, both ends restored, selvages rebound, scattered small reweaves
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool and silk

    Stylized pomegranate trees with flowers and fruits grow on a deep saffron-yellow ground, whereby parts were knotted in pale purple silk. At both ends are seven mihrabs, whose inner fields are covered with flowering plants, alternately in madder and walnut dyed wool executed and overgrown.

    The borders consist of simple, narrow serrated patterns. There is apparently no comparable piece in literature to this famous rug from the F. R. Martin collection in Sweden (see F. R. Martin: “A History of Oriental Carpets before 1800”, London 1908, p. 116).

    In his opinion, the unusual design, which is undoubtedly of Central Asian origin and came to the West along the Silk Road, could have been derived from earlier velvet upholstered rugs.

    This much-publicized carpet (among others as cover picture Weltkunst, 54th year, no. 8, 1984) came up for auction at Sotheby’s London (lot 57) on October 12th 1983 from the possession of Carl Johan Lamm, Stockholm, and was purchased by Peter Bausback, Mannheim.

    Estimate: € 30000 - 40000
    12 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    12 000 €

    Lot: 38

    163 x 129 cm (5’ 4” x 4’ 3”)
    Turkey, early 17th century
    Condition: good according to age, low pile, both ends slightly incomplete, slightly stained, selvages rebound, several old repairs
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool

    This carpet is one of the very rare white-ground prayer rugs of Anatolia from the beginning of the 17th century. The border consists of cartouches, which are separated by yellow or beige triangles can be to create a mosaic-like pictorial effect.
    The secondary border is drawn as a lattice design in beige, red and yellow-brown. The colours are usually double-mixed in themselves, whereby a special richness of colour is achieved. The two columns of the carpet stand freely in the white-ground prayer gable.

    They are directly derived from the Ottoman court carpets of the 16th century and thus plastically drawn that a perspective effect is produced, which in such a form appears here for the first time. For this reason a origin around 1600 seems very likely, because later Column Ladiks show this drawing no more.

    On the chapter there are triangles which support the yellow-ground pediment, which in turn is decorated with small tulips and carnations and freely distributed rosette flowers. This drawing also has its direct model in the Ottoman court carpets.

    The completely unpatterned white prayer field is divided into a larger one at the top right and several smaller balancing lines, so-called lazy-lines.

    A comparative piece with a red prayer field and six narrow columns on similar, but no longer perspectively drawn foundations can be found in the Black Church in Kronstadt with the inventory number 126, described there as Transylvanian prayer rug, Ladik region (see Gombos Károly, Aszkéták, Dervisek, Imaszönyegek, Budapest 1984, cat. No. 51, for the gable field Kat. No. 3). This carpet, of whose type allegedly only three pieces worldwide are preserved, comes from royal Wittelsbach property.

    Estimate: € 25000 - 35000
    12 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    10 000 €

    Lot: 39

    280 x 228 cm (9’ 2” x 7’ 6”)
    Turkmenistan, early 19th century or even earlier
    Condition: good according to age, mostly good pile, several old repairs and sewn up tears, lower kilim replaced, selvages rebound
    Warp: wool, weft: wool, pile: wool with silk highlights

    In his very complete analysis of Salor main carpets in Turkmen Carpets (2016), Jurg Rageth lists sixteen examples with five columns of twelve gülli-göls, almost half of the thirty-seven complete published examples. He also describes Salor main carpets as the classical carpets of the Turkmen tribes with the weave, dye and design quality setting the standard for all other Turkmen tribal weavings, and establishes the date range of 16th-19th century, during which period the design remained remarkably consistent.

    This example has the clear madder red ground colour expected of examples from the late 18th/early 19th century and is in very good pile with a few areas of repiling.There are small areas of cochineal dyed silk in the centre of the göls, helping to demonstrate another Rageth observation about Salor weavings in that early examples use silk in contrast to other Turkmen weavings, where silk is used in later examples. It is worth noting that the survival of the kilims ends is rare.

    Estimate: € 35000 - 50000
    10 000 €
  • Startpreis / Startingbid

    3 000 €

    Lot: 40

    260 x 162 cm (8’ 6” x 5’ 4”)
    Azerbaijan, second half 19th century
    Condition: good, scattered small old repairs, minor signs of use
    Warp: wool, weft: wool

    Estimate: € 6000 - 8000
    3 000 €
Showing 21 - 40 of 76 items